The Glittering Court by Richelle Mead (2016)

Rating: 3.5 stars.27272506.jpg

Adelaide, a countess who poses as a servant, decides to forsake her life with the hopes that the Glittering Court will provide her with an escape from an arranged marriage. The Glittering Court, is a business venture that trains lower class girls in refinement and helps Adelaide prepare for her future as a wife of a noble of her choosing. After all of her schooling, and her great voyage to the new colony, Adelaide realizes that complications soon arise.

When I started this book, I wasn’t sure I’d stick with it, as these kinds of “royalty” books don’t tend to interest me. I did find myself however quite captivated by the writing. The first two thirds I enjoyed, and somewhat expected, but the last third was something else entirely and not at all what I had expected from reading the description.

The book in a way, reads like a historical fiction in a different world setting. There’s no magic, but everything feels like the growth of U.S. in its early stages of colonialism. In many ways, it made it very easy to picture.

I’ve not read anything by Richelle Mead. Vampire Academy is on my radar, although after having watched the trailer, I’d lost interest in it. This book hasn’t swayed me in either direction of checking out the series.

I’d really liked to have seen more growth from the main character. Sure, she changed and grew over time, but perhaps expressing a more profound understanding of people who have to work so hard in the lower classes. It felt a little lack luster. The initial descriptions of her unable to even dress herself sounded a little silly.

Recommendations: If you’re a fan of Mead, I couldn’t tell you if its similar in style, but from the reviews I’ve read, it seems to be. I’d be more inclined to recommend it to those who have an interest in historical fiction because that is how it reads.

 

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About K2Harvey

Reading, and writing about it.
This entry was posted in Historical Fiction, Literature, YA and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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